Apical ballooning-like syndrome: Hypocalcemia? What else!

CASE STUDY, January 2016, VOL IV ISSUE I, ISSN 2042-4884
10.5083/ejcm.20424884.143 , Cite or Link Using DOI
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Maria Accadia MD, Marianna Abitabile MD, Salvatore Rumolo MD, Scotto di Uccio Fortunato MD, Luigi Irace MD, Andrea Tuccillo MD, Giuseppe Mercogliano MD, Bernardino Tuccillo MD

Introduction

Apical ballooning syndrome (ABS), also known as Takotsubo or stress cardiomyopathy,  is characterised by acute, transient and severe LV dysfunction, mimicking myocardial infarction; it occurs, in most cases, in the absence of obstructive coronary disease and is precipitated by severe emotional or physical stress, but many other potential triggers has been identified in the last years. Although the pathogenesis of  ABS remains unclear, the most common mechanisms suggested are coronary vasospam and an exaggerated sympathetic activation associated to high levels of plasma  cathecolamine leading to cardiotoxicity.We describe two cases of Apical Ballooning like Syndrome  that were triggered by severe, acute  hypocalcemia, without evidence of coronary vasospasm and with normal hematic level of cathecolamines.